Saskatchewan Immigration & Jobs in Saskatchewan with Daria Coneghan of IRIS in Regina, Saskatchewan. Canada

In this Bernie Chats episode, for JobsinCanada.com, Bernie chats with Daria Coneghan of IRIS in Regina, Saskatchewan.

Together, they explore how entrepreneurs & workers can immigrate to and set up business in Saskatchewan, Canada.

Daria Coneghan is an Entrepreneur and President of Reach International Recruitment & Immigration Services, based in Regina Saskatchewan. 

This podcast was originally recorded in late 2021. The main information remains current at time of publishing. 

Topics, full transcript & timeline is listed Below.

Get more information on the Saskatchewan Jobs page on JobsinCanada.com: https://jobsincanada.com/provinces/saskatchewan-jobs/

YouTube Transcript:

0:00
immigration to saskatchewan canada for entrepreneurs and workers welcome to this bernie chats with daria conahan
0:08
president reach international recruitment and immigration services
0:14
[Music]
0:22
hello everybody welcome to bernie chats we’re recording on behalf of jobs in canada.com today and we’re joined by
0:28
daria conahan ceo of reach international recruitment and immigration based out of
0:34
saskatchewan canada daria thanks for joining us how are you today i’m doing great i’m in sunny saskatchewan it’s
0:41
great here so how are things going in saskatchewan as far as the skills market the labor market how’s how’s that
0:47
looking these days especially in light of the pandemic well we’ve got the pandemic to deal with
0:53
but saskatchewan is booming really we just announced that cargill is putting a
0:59
huge plant in here and also grant industries is
1:04
putting in a 1.3 million dollar edition that’s going to add more jobs and and
1:10
you’re quite involved in the agricultural side and the hospitality side i remember you told me
1:16
well a little bit i mean you can’t be from saskatchewan and not be involved in agriculture right i suppose yeah yeah
1:23
yeah for our listeners saskatchewan is uh very spread out it’s not very concentrated in the cities the cities
1:29
are not that large they’re about what 200 000 people in a province of what about 1.1 million
1:36
something like that something like that 1.3 we have a lot of space
1:41
yeah so there’s a lot of a lot of nice towns whereas manitoba tends to be more centralized over half the population is
1:48
in winnipeg for instance and there’s very few cities outside of winnipeg yeah i mean these are regina saskatoon
1:56
prince albert right we have some great little towns and and uh helmets outside but
2:03
uh we’re largely agriculture we have a lot of pot we’re very diverse we have a lot of
2:09
lentils so agriculture is big here it’s a gamut of
2:15
skills and trades here when you talk about the factory that’s being built by cargill do
2:20
you have any idea what kind of scale that that project’s going to be and is it primarily cattle related no i don’t
2:27
think it’s cattle related and i honestly i don’t know much about it except that everyone was doing a big happy dance and
2:33
i think they said 1500 jobs 1500 jobs that’s a lot yeah do you think the current
2:40
labor availability in saskatchewan can sustain that or will they have to bring in people from outside of saskatchewan
2:47
or outside of canada i think you’re going to have to bring people in it’s very tough to get workers right now
2:54
the jobs are there as we reopen especially in in different
3:00
sectors i know hospitality industry is opening up again and they’re not finding
3:05
enough workers i i would imagine that we’ll have to bring in or
3:11
you know another route to go for someone looking to have a career here in the
3:16
skills and trades we have absolutely fantastic education systems um sas
3:22
polytech is the skills and trades if i were looking for my child to get into something i would see wow saskatchewan’s
3:29
booming here’s a school get them into a trade get them in through apprenticeship
3:35
great so is there anything about saskatchewan that makes it unique from other other provinces regarding
3:41
occupation lists for entry or or the pnp program or anything like that
3:47
an immigrant nominee program simp uh has several sectors there’s several
3:53
streams and instead of having a list of jobs that they accept they have a list that
3:59
they don’t accept because many so there’s a an occupation’s exclusion list in here
4:07
occupation isn’t on that list you’re eligible to apply for occupations
4:12
and demands and occupations in demand are our occupations that saskatchewan needs
4:19
now or is going to need in the future and so you can apply for that without a
4:25
job offer and that’s very unique so you can apply to come in without having a job lined up
4:30
right you need to score they have a grid and so you score 60 points or higher
4:35
right be honest it’s higher the competition would dictate that they would pick the highest numbers
4:40
absolutely that’s a great program our clb is lower at uh clb4 that’s to do with your
4:48
language score okay so clb is a language score yeah and and are they open to french and english
4:54
or is it only english no open to french and english and if you have both you get more points bonus
5:00
points for sure um so there’s occupations in demand and
5:07
then there’s expressed entry and then of course there’s the job offer there’s farm
5:12
there’s so many streams one thing for sure that people your listeners need to know is that we always need an education
5:20
credential assessment done it’s fairly easy to get they don’t have to pay someone like me to get it they can go to
5:26
wes.org and apply and it just verifies their
5:31
education that they’re claiming so it’s a educational verification is it instant or does it have to be researched and
5:37
then come back to them and it comes back to them so there’s a time academic it has been taking time and going through
5:44
the pnp program you do need a french or an english language test i primarily
5:49
work in saskatchewan right recently branched out to nova scotia as well when
5:55
you go to nova scotia do you bring your zebras with you yeah that’s my staff and you know what they’re so good
6:02
[Laughter] they don’t do what i tell them but they listen so they’re actually foreign
6:08
workers yes [Laughter] they got their pr
6:14
they got their pr that’s great um step in and say one thing about that’s very unique about
6:21
saskatchewan uh is that if someone a foreign worker were to come and they’re in a skilled
6:28
trade or management position they can apply for pr within after six months
6:35
oh yeah in saskatchewan i just want to unpack that a little bit in saskatchewan if you secure a job
6:43
work in that position for six months then you can apply for for a permanent
6:48
residence right whereas in most provinces it’s a year or two yeah
6:54
great that’s really good and what about for students what’s that path like in saskatchewan
7:00
it’s it’s pretty good um we have a great university i well i graduated university of regina more times
7:07
so once they they’ve graduated and they can get a postgraduate work permit which will allow them to work for
7:14
an employer and then again after six months through saskatchewan experience
7:20
they can apply great well another thing about our program is that if you apply through the oid
7:28
through occupations in demand or express entry and you have a relative in saskatchewan you get more points
7:37
that’s good because that’s more likely to keep you there if you have some some roots there or some family or some
7:43
support network right exactly support network and show you around town and show you how to get
7:48
your banking and right and and there’s less likelihood of uh getting homesick being lonely you have
7:55
you create another family right more or less so daria what are you focused on these
8:00
days what is your your main focus my i started in this industry because i love travel i’ve been to i think
8:07
31 countries i like learning about different cultures and things like that and
8:13
then this started opening up i thought wow this does everything but i also have a passion for business which which
8:20
programs are you most uh familiar with that we can dig in a little bit is it student programs or or is there any
8:26
quite a bit of students with with the u of r and it’s it’s fairly seamless the thing with
8:33
the students is they have to have their eca done of course
8:41
uh the educational credential assessments right that we discussed before their language tests they can come for
8:49
esl let’s say you have someone who wants to
8:54
go to school and do their certificate diploma va first of all it should be in line with
9:00
what you’ve been doing previously you can’t suddenly say i’ve been you
9:05
know doing something for 10 years and now i want to get into this
9:10
really easy route right right so and if you don’t have your language
9:16
test you can get a conditional approval so that you can write your or
9:23
you take an esl class here but just because the school has invited you does not mean the visa officer will
9:30
let you in okay that’s really important because i have no control school has no
9:37
control so it should be in line with with what you’re capable of doing what your
9:42
interests are and go from there so to unpack that a little bit um
9:51
you can you can get a visa to study english in preparation for a course so you could say i’m i’m going
9:57
to take dental hygiene let’s say or whatever whatever the demand is that falls in line with your previous
10:04
occupation and before that you could study english conditionally in other words i’m
10:09
assuming that you have to pass it in order to continue on right
10:15
right yeah now because of colbit um the government has allowed people to study
10:21
from their own country right i was wondering about that i was wondering if
10:27
well there’s that and i was wondering about the working side of that too but why don’t you finish that and i’ll go to the working side well you know um
10:35
a lot of people it’s not just that canada doesn’t want people coming in
10:41
a lot of people are afraid to come in they may be in a country that has
10:46
you know less cases than us right right and they want to stay home so
10:52
they’re allowed to now uh stay home and do up to 50 percent
10:57
or more i think you may might have even changed it of their program and still go towards post-graduate work permit
11:05
so so you could have a study visa and do fifty percent of your studying in
11:12
your home country and the other 50 percent on the ground in the institution or the the educational facility in
11:19
saskatchewan right and they may have to change that um
11:24
i haven’t done processed any under that right so every day things are changing
11:31
so it is um it’s tough to to give that’s that’s why
11:38
i guess my job is here because i have to say i literally read about an hour’s worth of changes every day wow to keep
11:46
up it comes through my desk and and things and you know let’s face it during this
11:51
crisis this pandemic most of us we’ve never experienced one before so we’re all on the fly whether
11:57
we’re politicians or employers or whoever we’re kind of navigating our way through it the best we can
12:04
um we’re making the rules as we play the game yeah we do want students and it is
12:09
getting safer here we’re all being vaccinated and things are opening up
12:15
so uh hopefully that the foreign worker that will open up more
12:22
and now that now they’ve said that if someone is double vaccinated and they won’t have to
12:29
do the government quarantine the hotel so that that’s huge because that was falling on
12:36
the employers to pay that and you know when you’re going in first of
12:42
all temporary foreign workers are a big investment for an employer right
12:48
and they’re a big investment from both sides so if you just go well maybe i’ll wait
12:54
this one out so i do think that the gates are going to open soon i’m hoping
13:00
so when you say a big investment for an employer what are the aspects of that investment what what
13:06
considerations are there for employers well employers who want to hire on their
13:11
own it’s a lot of time you know you advertise one
13:16
one job you and you’re gonna get 300 work you know applications going through
13:22
all them to me see of course we have to hire a canadian permanent
13:29
resident first and foremost and if there’s one available to do the job then you must hire a canadian but you
13:36
screen all 300 applicants to see where they’re from
13:41
you have to open every single one and then go and if you can’t find a canadian or permanent residence it involves
13:48
interviewing them checking their education checking their credentials
13:53
you know interviewing them also pay for the advertising
13:59
if you’re doing an lmia a permit it’s a thousand dollars
14:04
if they’re coming in and they have to be quarantined you pay for the quarantine and you pay their wages while they’re in
14:10
quarantine oh okay so that is an investment it is a huge investment and and
14:16
often people foreign workers um may not be able to hit the ground
14:21
running maybe they need to a bit of adjustment into canadian culture into the way things are
14:28
done skills and trades and so there’s there’s that so we’re really
14:34
you know at my company we’re really about connecting the right people with the
14:39
right employers we want them to stay we want them to be happy and
14:44
business to boom great that’s awesome that’s great information so digging into a little bit about the
14:51
the considerations for employers what happens with with medical when when
14:56
a foreign job seeker comes in are they automatically on the medical system or do they have to wait three months or how
15:01
does that work uh that’s one of the great things about saskatchewan is you have your medical
15:08
and that’s not the same in every province no we’re at home with tommy douglas we’re all american yeah that’s right for
15:15
people who don’t know the uh the medical system as we know it medicare was
15:21
uh originated with one of the politicians from saskatchewan uh douglas
15:27
um and and so does the the foreign recruiter the your yourself as a foreign recruiter do you check the references
15:33
for these people or does the employer have to do that no we do that and we check um we make sure that they’re
15:41
translated we make sure that we verify that they came from there that they’re translated to english
15:47
that um you know the eca the education credential assessment is done through
15:53
usually wes and we check the validity of their aisles and all that kind of stuff and
15:59
also we do check their medical and their criminal background okay so you do a criminal record check you check their
16:06
medical to make sure they don’t have ailments that they’re going to become a burden to the medical system on right
16:11
right or an ineffective worker right right um
16:17
do you do a credit check on them somebody asked me about that because they do credit check on their employees
16:23
no okay i i mean that could easily be done right
16:29
yeah that wouldn’t no i mean which depending which country i guess right and how formal they
16:35
i we do it for the business people okay right but i’ve never had that come
16:40
across for a worker but i don’t think it would be yeah i was surprised an hr person asked me that question
16:48
um how how are the terms for foreign workers one year two year three year
16:54
it depends on what what the employer wants okay and generally
17:00
behind it is you know what if i’m hiring a foreign worker and i put in two years i really
17:07
want to keep them right for sure you’ve made a big investment yeah the goal is to keep them and keep
17:15
them with your company grow with your company they’ve had two years and they know it
17:21
yeah you they’re more self-sufficient at that point and the reason you got them in the first place is because you couldn’t find anybody to start with
17:27
right there there are some occupations um like in in agriculture that the
17:33
temporary farm workers are seasonal right a lot of people from mexico come up to work in the fields and vineyards
17:42
things like that and they don’t necessarily want to stay so what kind of yeah because they are
17:48
making money to support their family back home right right it makes sense i know in british
17:53
columbia back about 10 years ago when i read the act the agricultural worker act for british
18:00
columbia it included uh transportation to and from uh latin america or wherever their
18:06
country was for i think it was at least one fight back and forth
18:12
per year so yeah under this there’s different not
18:17
codes um right o is management is management b is skilled
18:24
c is less c and d or lesser skill under the lesser-skilled trades
18:29
an employer is obligated to pay the airfare okay great and so how does
18:36
saskatchewan’s agricultural worker program work is it similar to other ones is it is it a possible track in as a
18:44
permanent residence or how do how does it work for yeah there is
18:49
um there is a way for under the saskatchewan experience
18:55
for agriculture there’s an agriculture pilot project that
19:00
actually it’s a federal stream too that will allow people to come in
19:05
and get permanent residency okay great and you you sorry you used a name there
19:11
that slipped my mind the the program that you mentioned uh experience saskatchewan so can you tell me a little
19:17
bit about the saskatchewan experience program well that’s what we were talking about earlier if you’ve had six months
19:24
experience in saskatchewan you’re eligible to apply i see that’s the program called saskatchewan experience
19:32
wonderful so one of the things i was wondering about about getting canadian work work
19:38
experience that maybe you can answer for me there’s a lot of people working remotely right now and a lot of companies want
19:45
their employees to work remotely so if for instance a company here wants to hire a foreign
19:51
worker who happens to be in let’s pick france uh and they want to hire them to work
19:59
for their company which is based in regina and then that and you see where i’m going with this that that company that
20:06
person works for that company for two years is that canadian work experience
20:11
and does that count towards their qualifications for
20:16
permanent residency go ahead funny you asked me that because i just asked that
20:22
question yesterday um and the answer is no the answer is
20:28
from saskatchewan or from feds from wherever in canada i asked a colleague okay
20:34
because that’s uh um i’m hiring right now and i found some in
20:40
a different country and i had hoped because of covid i had hoped
20:46
that we could start um okay so so working in another country
20:52
for a company that has their employees working remotely currently does not apply to canadian work experience it has
20:58
to be work experience in canada uh on the ground you have to be living here
21:04
for that time to qualify okay that’s good that’s good to know yeah now someone has a company in another
21:11
country and wants to establish here their top management they’re skilled
21:17
people over just to work at the company okay an inter-company transfer there’s so
21:23
many streams what skills are more in demand in saskatchewan right now that you’re seeing come across your desk are
21:30
you seeing more administrative more agriculture more hospitality i mean what kind of numbers uh there’s more
21:36
hospitality okay right now and i’ve heard that across the country
21:42
because the hospitality industry you can’t work from home
21:48
right and i think a lot of hospitality workers who’ve been affected by kovid
21:53
have realized this is not that secure if there’s ever another repeat of covet and currently it’s up and down
22:00
so a lot of them are taking the opportunity to retrain maybe get it financed by serb or
22:05
whatever program is available right and take another career path right
22:11
and yeah and it’s tough my son’s a cook and two people on like one on each side of
22:18
them tested positive oh really wow and there’s nothing that hits reality
22:23
like going to see your son and dropping groceries off while he’s on the other side of a door
22:30
right so a lot of the people don’t want to come back maybe into the industry or i don’t know
22:37
but for whatever reason um that seems to be the big one if you have
22:42
you know if you are in an administrative or managerial position
22:47
you can do that remotely a lot easier right
22:53
and and so like saskatchewan being a let me repeat that saskatchewan being a
22:59
large agricultural producer i’m assuming there’s a fair amount of food processing companies there too or are there
23:08
uh there are that i mean we’ve got a couple big lentils
23:14
we’ve got the sask wheat pool that is a co-op but we don’t have a lot of huge large
23:21
industries so you don’t have companies that are making
23:26
mass quantities of bread or cereal boxes or or
23:31
not that i know of okay yeah yeah i know at one time they were trying to to uh acquire those kinds of
23:38
processors because it makes sense i mean go to the source and produce it there and then ship it out but then i guess
23:43
they want to ship the raw materials like we tend to do in canada ship the raw materials and have it
23:49
processed uh closer to the population well here are the big farms i mean
23:56
really really big farms and one of the i was on a conference call and one of the issues that came up for
24:02
agriculture is that the farmers here they want a worker who
24:08
understands the community aspect of how we are here right we’re community
24:15
oriented and we have to be when it’s freezing cold out you have to be a good person so someone
24:22
will come boost your car push you over the snow bank for sure each other out to survive here they want that but they
24:28
they also need um it’s a whole new world you may have a tractor that has three computers on it
24:37
somebody who’s computer savvy you know the younger generation
24:44
they’re just born with these things in their hand where so we need that that input and and know
24:51
how to do that so there’s a disconnect i think in
24:56
what we need and what we can get also our tractors things like that may
25:02
not be the same as in in a foreign country
25:07
they may be more technologically well phil and and from what i’ve seen saskatchewan and other countries the
25:14
equipment in saskatchewan is massive huge i mean you got huge combines and
25:20
you know they’re they’re industrial size they’re not just little tractors yeah it’s crazy
25:26
i went out yeah you know bought rural right i’m saying wow look at that
25:32
tractor i never thought that it’s impressive
25:37
i guess the other thing in saskatchewan too is mining and open pit mining potash stuff like that is that still a going
25:42
concern that we are i think we’re amongst the biggest in the world here
25:50
say it again please sorry that’s plain uh up north we have you know cigar lake
25:57
we have uh kojima and camaco are the two big mining companies here okay and do
26:03
you know if they um hire foreign workers they probably do
26:08
um okay i haven’t been really in touch with them so much now when you look at up north the oil
26:14
fields and the mining took a big hit right it did yeah with a drop in
26:20
commodities prices really dropped and i think people were laid off and
26:27
but it’s picking up again you know great so what why don’t we
26:32
sorry go ahead we’ve done remarkably well through this pandemic good really have things are happening
26:38
here oh that’s great great so why don’t we dig into two things then
26:44
uh i want to ask you a little bit more about students and a little bit more about
26:49
your business uh startup program so so with the students what advice do
26:57
you have for students or people that want to take the student path in
27:03
in getting their permanent residency in canada so to to enter the student path
27:08
and become canadian citizens eventually take your courses carefully get them in
27:14
line with what what you know what you’re passionate about find a course that’s
27:21
a good fit for you that will give you a post-graduate work permit
27:26
two things you know we might be able to help out and i’ll give a plug at students at riri
27:34
i have a director that will help out choosing a course and a path
27:40
we work with any school or institution in canada but primarily with the university of regina
27:46
and i find that works because i’m five minutes away i’ve worked there i’ve graduated from there i know it’s it’s a
27:53
great school um but as i said previously sas polytech is a
27:59
fantastic skills reach international will be implementing
28:06
a direct student to work to pr
28:12
program for select probably starting in agriculture maybe some health care and hospitality
28:19
and that’ll be in 2022 and it’ll be a pilot project for us
28:24
where we will assist people who come into one of the industries if
28:30
it’s hospitality tourism it would be because that fits with our other area
28:37
or ag something like that and they take their their course they get their
28:43
postgraduate work permit will give them some canadian experiences some saskatchewan experience that they can go
28:50
into sorry can you you got that the bell again can you repeat that yeah i don’t even know how to turn it off i’m sorry no worries
28:56
but uh like i’m saying let’s say we have someone going into hospitality and
29:02
tourism then we’ll get help them get into school get into the appropriate program
29:09
and when they’re done we’ll give them an internship or work experience program
29:15
for at least the six months that will qualify them for pr
29:20
great that’s that’s super yeah i’m finding you know i’m a parent and i see all these moms
29:27
and dads sending their children to canada for a better life and
29:32
they go into courses like when i went to school everybody got a bachelor of psychology
29:41
and did nothing with it and so i really want to help these people send their children here and say here
29:49
here’s a great path to go on and maybe they won’t stay on
29:54
that path but i’ll sure open their eyes and they’ll be exposed to different things they might be our next restaurant
30:00
owner you know or or entrepreneur or you know start farming or do something
30:08
i think it’s kind of my passion you know to help people out like that and that’s
30:13
wonderful i think having that that kind of insight and experience uh to learn from and and choose a path i think is
30:20
going to be really helpful for a lot of people it’s um it’s hard to have the kind of foresight
30:26
and stuff when you’re a young person you haven’t really connected all the dots yet right
30:31
yeah so that’s good so what kind of resources if somebody wants to do that take that path what kind of resources should they
30:38
have and what kind of steps should they take to get started i mean every every path starts with one step right right
30:45
right well first of all i mean again if they email us
30:50
we can help them do that and and just for we have different people in charge of different areas so
30:56
it’s students at riri.ca business at
31:02
riris.ca you know employers at riri.ca and it helps because we get so many
31:10
so many things um sure you can stream them to the right people right and you know if they forget that just go to our
31:16
website ri r-i-r-i-dot-c we have so much information but if someone wants to
31:22
you know go and help needs help on a direct path to pr um they can certainly email us and we’ll
31:30
see how they can fit into a school and get them into that so that they can go
31:36
on to what they need to do excellent uh you know if i can say
31:43
if you know if you are going through a consultant uh you
31:48
honestly you get what you deserve if you don’t go through somebody who’s licensed and i can’t stress that enough there’s
31:56
so many what we call ghost consultants out there who aren’t licensed and i for instance i’m licensed
32:03
in canada through iccrc they have everybody listed on their website you can check people out
32:09
yeah so so the takeaway there is if you’re if you’re uh dealing with somebody about immigrating to canada
32:16
and you want to check their credentials you can simply just go to the ircc iccrc
32:23
the ic crc website yeah and and put in their information and make sure they’re
32:28
a registered uh immigration consultant right but in saskatchewan you have to also be licensed there
32:35
so you may be on the iccrc site right and saying oh i can get you a job or
32:40
whatever in saskatchewan and if you’re not licensed here it’s still illegal and also in nova
32:47
scotia and how would you ver how would you verify lawyer credentials
32:53
for a foreign if you want to go through a lawyer i would imagine just the bar
33:00
so you’d check the the saskatchewan bar and then the bar over each different province to make sure they’re they’re uh
33:07
red they’re they actually have their bar and they’re registered um as lawyers in that province
33:13
yeah yeah don’t believe on their website just because it says on a website
33:18
doesn’t mean it’s true yeah and it’s heartbreaking how many people i get that have spent tens and thousands
33:26
of dollars really yeah well a lot so
33:32
on that note do you want to share roughly what you what somebody should expect to pay as a job seeker or as an
33:39
employer for either going through a process or to come into
33:44
canada or to um to recruit foreign job seekers what is
33:50
there a number you can share with us that would be like an industry standard or expectation industry standard okay
33:55
there isn’t there really isn’t um we’re all private practices
34:01
so it’s not you know it’s um i guess the key
34:06
takeaway from that is shop around but i may charge you 200 an hour
34:14
and you may charge 400 an hour but you might get it done in half an hour and i’ll take six hours yup okay so so i
34:21
think you have to weigh uh the knowledge of the person and um generally under our oath we don’t
34:28
take cases that we’re not confident in so if i’m not sure about something i will
34:35
go to a colleague and ask them to to do it with me
34:40
awesome you know i think the one thing about the rric is the regulated
34:47
immigration consultancies we we want the best for our clients and we we want success at the end
34:54
where you have somebody a ghost consultant
35:01
what are you going to do you have no record you have no recourse is that the idea yeah well they’re
35:06
usually outside canada i think um i looked up a number and there was only 13 registered in india but there must be
35:13
hundreds of offices hmm i see you know there’s two i think registered
35:19
in vietnam and there’s hundreds of offices so okay
35:25
so do your homework if you’re if you’re looking to come to canada you’re you’re a foreign job seeker or you want to come
35:30
in as a student do your homework do your research to make sure they’re legitimate and shop around talk to
35:37
three or ten or however many you feel you should and make sure you find somebody that’s comfortable with you
35:43
probably a bad sign is somebody who wants you to to not to talk to other people and just to uh just forge ahead
35:49
with them and and do your due diligence
35:54
exactly yeah everything is available on the cip website
36:00
people can do it on their own well that’s one thing for people to take away as well is that the canadian
36:05
government has tons of information there’s canada is very good at putting all kinds
36:11
of helpful information online uh including you know sites like jobsoncanada.com and
36:17
private sites like that as well as government sites and the provincial sites i think the provincial sites are
36:22
really key too because i think that’s probably overlooked by a lot of foreign job seekers is okay there’s a federal program for
36:28
coming into canada but what about the specific programs of coming into saskatchewan ontario manitoba nova
36:34
scotia right right and and our site at riri.ca we have so much information
36:43
on everything because i noticed that guy oh awesome that helps nothing to do
36:49
with me he’s behind this but um you know there’s a lot of information
36:55
but it does speak to it is a life-changing
37:01
decision that people are making it is a lot of money no matter which way you look at it
37:08
you know selling your assets in your house and everything another country moving over
37:13
so it’s your comfort level do you want a professional taking care of you you know and and we take them right from
37:21
the beginning whether it’s a student a worker a business person right through to settlement services
37:27
helping people find the right place to live schools and all that kind of stuff
37:32
right or so having having a guide to take you through so you’re not in the dark trying to figure out where
37:38
the nooks and crannies and turns and and uh pathways are well i swear that things
37:44
can change on the fly here i sometimes wonder if they wake up and say
37:49
i you know i need to print something new today well and i think now there’s a lot
37:54
there’s going to be a lot of changes because the whole world is changing yeah yeah
38:00
yeah that’s so great daria thanks so much for joining us welcome thank you coach i
38:05
really appreciate it take care ciao bye and that concludes this bernie chats for
38:11
jobs in canada.com thank you so much for listening please feel free to subscribe
38:16
like share and comment i look forward to seeing you on the next bernie chats for jobs in canada.com

0:00
immigration to saskatchewan canada for entrepreneurs and workers welcome to this bernie chats with daria conahan
0:08
president reach international recruitment and immigration services
0:14
[Music]
0:22
hello everybody welcome to bernie chats we’re recording on behalf of jobs in canada.com today and we’re joined by
0:28
daria conahan ceo of reach international recruitment and immigration based out of
0:34
saskatchewan canada daria thanks for joining us how are you today i’m doing great i’m in sunny saskatchewan it’s
0:41
great here so how are things going in saskatchewan as far as the skills market the labor market how’s how’s that
0:47
looking these days especially in light of the pandemic well we’ve got the pandemic to deal with
0:53
but saskatchewan is booming really we just announced that cargill is putting a
0:59
huge plant in here and also grant industries is
1:04
putting in a 1.3 million dollar edition that’s going to add more jobs and and
1:10
you’re quite involved in the agricultural side and the hospitality side i remember you told me
1:16
well a little bit i mean you can’t be from saskatchewan and not be involved in agriculture right i suppose yeah yeah
1:23
yeah for our listeners saskatchewan is uh very spread out it’s not very concentrated in the cities the cities
1:29
are not that large they’re about what 200 000 people in a province of what about 1.1 million
1:36
something like that something like that 1.3 we have a lot of space
1:41
yeah so there’s a lot of a lot of nice towns whereas manitoba tends to be more centralized over half the population is
1:48
in winnipeg for instance and there’s very few cities outside of winnipeg yeah i mean these are regina saskatoon
1:56
prince albert right we have some great little towns and and uh helmets outside but
2:03
uh we’re largely agriculture we have a lot of pot we’re very diverse we have a lot of
2:09
lentils so agriculture is big here it’s a gamut of
2:15
skills and trades here when you talk about the factory that’s being built by cargill do
2:20
you have any idea what kind of scale that that project’s going to be and is it primarily cattle related no i don’t
2:27
think it’s cattle related and i honestly i don’t know much about it except that everyone was doing a big happy dance and
2:33
i think they said 1500 jobs 1500 jobs that’s a lot yeah do you think the current
2:40
labor availability in saskatchewan can sustain that or will they have to bring in people from outside of saskatchewan
2:47
or outside of canada i think you’re going to have to bring people in it’s very tough to get workers right now
2:54
the jobs are there as we reopen especially in in different
3:00
sectors i know hospitality industry is opening up again and they’re not finding
3:05
enough workers i i would imagine that we’ll have to bring in or
3:11
you know another route to go for someone looking to have a career here in the
3:16
skills and trades we have absolutely fantastic education systems um sas
3:22
polytech is the skills and trades if i were looking for my child to get into something i would see wow saskatchewan’s
3:29
booming here’s a school get them into a trade get them in through apprenticeship
3:35
great so is there anything about saskatchewan that makes it unique from other other provinces regarding
3:41
occupation lists for entry or or the pnp program or anything like that
3:47
an immigrant nominee program simp uh has several sectors there’s several
3:53
streams and instead of having a list of jobs that they accept they have a list that
3:59
they don’t accept because many so there’s a an occupation’s exclusion list in here
4:07
occupation isn’t on that list you’re eligible to apply for occupations
4:12
and demands and occupations in demand are our occupations that saskatchewan needs
4:19
now or is going to need in the future and so you can apply for that without a
4:25
job offer and that’s very unique so you can apply to come in without having a job lined up
4:30
right you need to score they have a grid and so you score 60 points or higher
4:35
right be honest it’s higher the competition would dictate that they would pick the highest numbers
4:40
absolutely that’s a great program our clb is lower at uh clb4 that’s to do with your
4:48
language score okay so clb is a language score yeah and and are they open to french and english
4:54
or is it only english no open to french and english and if you have both you get more points bonus
5:00
points for sure um so there’s occupations in demand and
5:07
then there’s expressed entry and then of course there’s the job offer there’s farm
5:12
there’s so many streams one thing for sure that people your listeners need to know is that we always need an education
5:20
credential assessment done it’s fairly easy to get they don’t have to pay someone like me to get it they can go to
5:26
wes.org and apply and it just verifies their
5:31
education that they’re claiming so it’s a educational verification is it instant or does it have to be researched and
5:37
then come back to them and it comes back to them so there’s a time academic it has been taking time and going through
5:44
the pnp program you do need a french or an english language test i primarily
5:49
work in saskatchewan right recently branched out to nova scotia as well when
5:55
you go to nova scotia do you bring your zebras with you yeah that’s my staff and you know what they’re so good
6:02
[Laughter] they don’t do what i tell them but they listen so they’re actually foreign
6:08
workers yes [Laughter] they got their pr
6:14
they got their pr that’s great um step in and say one thing about that’s very unique about
6:21
saskatchewan uh is that if someone a foreign worker were to come and they’re in a skilled
6:28
trade or management position they can apply for pr within after six months
6:35
oh yeah in saskatchewan i just want to unpack that a little bit in saskatchewan if you secure a job
6:43
work in that position for six months then you can apply for for a permanent
6:48
residence right whereas in most provinces it’s a year or two yeah
6:54
great that’s really good and what about for students what’s that path like in saskatchewan
7:00
it’s it’s pretty good um we have a great university i well i graduated university of regina more times
7:07
so once they they’ve graduated and they can get a postgraduate work permit which will allow them to work for
7:14
an employer and then again after six months through saskatchewan experience
7:20
they can apply great well another thing about our program is that if you apply through the oid
7:28
through occupations in demand or express entry and you have a relative in saskatchewan you get more points
7:37
that’s good because that’s more likely to keep you there if you have some some roots there or some family or some
7:43
support network right exactly support network and show you around town and show you how to get
7:48
your banking and right and and there’s less likelihood of uh getting homesick being lonely you have
7:55
you create another family right more or less so daria what are you focused on these
8:00
days what is your your main focus my i started in this industry because i love travel i’ve been to i think
8:07
31 countries i like learning about different cultures and things like that and
8:13
then this started opening up i thought wow this does everything but i also have a passion for business which which
8:20
programs are you most uh familiar with that we can dig in a little bit is it student programs or or is there any
8:26
quite a bit of students with with the u of r and it’s it’s fairly seamless the thing with
8:33
the students is they have to have their eca done of course
8:41
uh the educational credential assessments right that we discussed before their language tests they can come for
8:49
esl let’s say you have someone who wants to
8:54
go to school and do their certificate diploma va first of all it should be in line with
9:00
what you’ve been doing previously you can’t suddenly say i’ve been you
9:05
know doing something for 10 years and now i want to get into this
9:10
really easy route right right so and if you don’t have your language
9:16
test you can get a conditional approval so that you can write your or
9:23
you take an esl class here but just because the school has invited you does not mean the visa officer will
9:30
let you in okay that’s really important because i have no control school has no
9:37
control so it should be in line with with what you’re capable of doing what your
9:42
interests are and go from there so to unpack that a little bit um
9:51
you can you can get a visa to study english in preparation for a course so you could say i’m i’m going
9:57
to take dental hygiene let’s say or whatever whatever the demand is that falls in line with your previous
10:04
occupation and before that you could study english conditionally in other words i’m
10:09
assuming that you have to pass it in order to continue on right
10:15
right yeah now because of colbit um the government has allowed people to study
10:21
from their own country right i was wondering about that i was wondering if
10:27
well there’s that and i was wondering about the working side of that too but why don’t you finish that and i’ll go to the working side well you know um
10:35
a lot of people it’s not just that canada doesn’t want people coming in
10:41
a lot of people are afraid to come in they may be in a country that has
10:46
you know less cases than us right right and they want to stay home so
10:52
they’re allowed to now uh stay home and do up to 50 percent
10:57
or more i think you may might have even changed it of their program and still go towards post-graduate work permit
11:05
so so you could have a study visa and do fifty percent of your studying in
11:12
your home country and the other 50 percent on the ground in the institution or the the educational facility in
11:19
saskatchewan right and they may have to change that um
11:24
i haven’t done processed any under that right so every day things are changing
11:31
so it is um it’s tough to to give that’s that’s why
11:38
i guess my job is here because i have to say i literally read about an hour’s worth of changes every day wow to keep
11:46
up it comes through my desk and and things and you know let’s face it during this
11:51
crisis this pandemic most of us we’ve never experienced one before so we’re all on the fly whether
11:57
we’re politicians or employers or whoever we’re kind of navigating our way through it the best we can
12:04
um we’re making the rules as we play the game yeah we do want students and it is
12:09
getting safer here we’re all being vaccinated and things are opening up
12:15
so uh hopefully that the foreign worker that will open up more
12:22
and now that now they’ve said that if someone is double vaccinated and they won’t have to
12:29
do the government quarantine the hotel so that that’s huge because that was falling on
12:36
the employers to pay that and you know when you’re going in first of
12:42
all temporary foreign workers are a big investment for an employer right
12:48
and they’re a big investment from both sides so if you just go well maybe i’ll wait
12:54
this one out so i do think that the gates are going to open soon i’m hoping
13:00
so when you say a big investment for an employer what are the aspects of that investment what what
13:06
considerations are there for employers well employers who want to hire on their
13:11
own it’s a lot of time you know you advertise one
13:16
one job you and you’re gonna get 300 work you know applications going through
13:22
all them to me see of course we have to hire a canadian permanent
13:29
resident first and foremost and if there’s one available to do the job then you must hire a canadian but you
13:36
screen all 300 applicants to see where they’re from
13:41
you have to open every single one and then go and if you can’t find a canadian or permanent residence it involves
13:48
interviewing them checking their education checking their credentials
13:53
you know interviewing them also pay for the advertising
13:59
if you’re doing an lmia a permit it’s a thousand dollars
14:04
if they’re coming in and they have to be quarantined you pay for the quarantine and you pay their wages while they’re in
14:10
quarantine oh okay so that is an investment it is a huge investment and and
14:16
often people foreign workers um may not be able to hit the ground
14:21
running maybe they need to a bit of adjustment into canadian culture into the way things are
14:28
done skills and trades and so there’s there’s that so we’re really
14:34
you know at my company we’re really about connecting the right people with the
14:39
right employers we want them to stay we want them to be happy and
14:44
business to boom great that’s awesome that’s great information so digging into a little bit about the
14:51
the considerations for employers what happens with with medical when when
14:56
a foreign job seeker comes in are they automatically on the medical system or do they have to wait three months or how
15:01
does that work uh that’s one of the great things about saskatchewan is you have your medical
15:08
and that’s not the same in every province no we’re at home with tommy douglas we’re all american yeah that’s right for
15:15
people who don’t know the uh the medical system as we know it medicare was
15:21
uh originated with one of the politicians from saskatchewan uh douglas
15:27
um and and so does the the foreign recruiter the your yourself as a foreign recruiter do you check the references
15:33
for these people or does the employer have to do that no we do that and we check um we make sure that they’re
15:41
translated we make sure that we verify that they came from there that they’re translated to english
15:47
that um you know the eca the education credential assessment is done through
15:53
usually wes and we check the validity of their aisles and all that kind of stuff and
15:59
also we do check their medical and their criminal background okay so you do a criminal record check you check their
16:06
medical to make sure they don’t have ailments that they’re going to become a burden to the medical system on right
16:11
right or an ineffective worker right right um
16:17
do you do a credit check on them somebody asked me about that because they do credit check on their employees
16:23
no okay i i mean that could easily be done right
16:29
yeah that wouldn’t no i mean which depending which country i guess right and how formal they
16:35
i we do it for the business people okay right but i’ve never had that come
16:40
across for a worker but i don’t think it would be yeah i was surprised an hr person asked me that question
16:48
um how how are the terms for foreign workers one year two year three year
16:54
it depends on what what the employer wants okay and generally
17:00
behind it is you know what if i’m hiring a foreign worker and i put in two years i really
17:07
want to keep them right for sure you’ve made a big investment yeah the goal is to keep them and keep
17:15
them with your company grow with your company they’ve had two years and they know it
17:21
yeah you they’re more self-sufficient at that point and the reason you got them in the first place is because you couldn’t find anybody to start with
17:27
right there there are some occupations um like in in agriculture that the
17:33
temporary farm workers are seasonal right a lot of people from mexico come up to work in the fields and vineyards
17:42
things like that and they don’t necessarily want to stay so what kind of yeah because they are
17:48
making money to support their family back home right right it makes sense i know in british
17:53
columbia back about 10 years ago when i read the act the agricultural worker act for british
18:00
columbia it included uh transportation to and from uh latin america or wherever their
18:06
country was for i think it was at least one fight back and forth
18:12
per year so yeah under this there’s different not
18:17
codes um right o is management is management b is skilled
18:24
c is less c and d or lesser skill under the lesser-skilled trades
18:29
an employer is obligated to pay the airfare okay great and so how does
18:36
saskatchewan’s agricultural worker program work is it similar to other ones is it is it a possible track in as a
18:44
permanent residence or how do how does it work for yeah there is
18:49
um there is a way for under the saskatchewan experience
18:55
for agriculture there’s an agriculture pilot project that
19:00
actually it’s a federal stream too that will allow people to come in
19:05
and get permanent residency okay great and you you sorry you used a name there
19:11
that slipped my mind the the program that you mentioned uh experience saskatchewan so can you tell me a little
19:17
bit about the saskatchewan experience program well that’s what we were talking about earlier if you’ve had six months
19:24
experience in saskatchewan you’re eligible to apply i see that’s the program called saskatchewan experience
19:32
wonderful so one of the things i was wondering about about getting canadian work work
19:38
experience that maybe you can answer for me there’s a lot of people working remotely right now and a lot of companies want
19:45
their employees to work remotely so if for instance a company here wants to hire a foreign
19:51
worker who happens to be in let’s pick france uh and they want to hire them to work
19:59
for their company which is based in regina and then that and you see where i’m going with this that that company that
20:06
person works for that company for two years is that canadian work experience
20:11
and does that count towards their qualifications for
20:16
permanent residency go ahead funny you asked me that because i just asked that
20:22
question yesterday um and the answer is no the answer is
20:28
from saskatchewan or from feds from wherever in canada i asked a colleague okay
20:34
because that’s uh um i’m hiring right now and i found some in
20:40
a different country and i had hoped because of covid i had hoped
20:46
that we could start um okay so so working in another country
20:52
for a company that has their employees working remotely currently does not apply to canadian work experience it has
20:58
to be work experience in canada uh on the ground you have to be living here
21:04
for that time to qualify okay that’s good that’s good to know yeah now someone has a company in another
21:11
country and wants to establish here their top management they’re skilled
21:17
people over just to work at the company okay an inter-company transfer there’s so
21:23
many streams what skills are more in demand in saskatchewan right now that you’re seeing come across your desk are
21:30
you seeing more administrative more agriculture more hospitality i mean what kind of numbers uh there’s more
21:36
hospitality okay right now and i’ve heard that across the country
21:42
because the hospitality industry you can’t work from home
21:48
right and i think a lot of hospitality workers who’ve been affected by kovid
21:53
have realized this is not that secure if there’s ever another repeat of covet and currently it’s up and down
22:00
so a lot of them are taking the opportunity to retrain maybe get it financed by serb or
22:05
whatever program is available right and take another career path right
22:11
and yeah and it’s tough my son’s a cook and two people on like one on each side of
22:18
them tested positive oh really wow and there’s nothing that hits reality
22:23
like going to see your son and dropping groceries off while he’s on the other side of a door
22:30
right so a lot of the people don’t want to come back maybe into the industry or i don’t know
22:37
but for whatever reason um that seems to be the big one if you have
22:42
you know if you are in an administrative or managerial position
22:47
you can do that remotely a lot easier right
22:53
and and so like saskatchewan being a let me repeat that saskatchewan being a
22:59
large agricultural producer i’m assuming there’s a fair amount of food processing companies there too or are there
23:08
uh there are that i mean we’ve got a couple big lentils
23:14
we’ve got the sask wheat pool that is a co-op but we don’t have a lot of huge large
23:21
industries so you don’t have companies that are making
23:26
mass quantities of bread or cereal boxes or or
23:31
not that i know of okay yeah yeah i know at one time they were trying to to uh acquire those kinds of
23:38
processors because it makes sense i mean go to the source and produce it there and then ship it out but then i guess
23:43
they want to ship the raw materials like we tend to do in canada ship the raw materials and have it
23:49
processed uh closer to the population well here are the big farms i mean
23:56
really really big farms and one of the i was on a conference call and one of the issues that came up for
24:02
agriculture is that the farmers here they want a worker who
24:08
understands the community aspect of how we are here right we’re community
24:15
oriented and we have to be when it’s freezing cold out you have to be a good person so someone
24:22
will come boost your car push you over the snow bank for sure each other out to survive here they want that but they
24:28
they also need um it’s a whole new world you may have a tractor that has three computers on it
24:37
somebody who’s computer savvy you know the younger generation
24:44
they’re just born with these things in their hand where so we need that that input and and know
24:51
how to do that so there’s a disconnect i think in
24:56
what we need and what we can get also our tractors things like that may
25:02
not be the same as in in a foreign country
25:07
they may be more technologically well phil and and from what i’ve seen saskatchewan and other countries the
25:14
equipment in saskatchewan is massive huge i mean you got huge combines and
25:20
you know they’re they’re industrial size they’re not just little tractors yeah it’s crazy
25:26
i went out yeah you know bought rural right i’m saying wow look at that
25:32
tractor i never thought that it’s impressive
25:37
i guess the other thing in saskatchewan too is mining and open pit mining potash stuff like that is that still a going
25:42
concern that we are i think we’re amongst the biggest in the world here
25:50
say it again please sorry that’s plain uh up north we have you know cigar lake
25:57
we have uh kojima and camaco are the two big mining companies here okay and do
26:03
you know if they um hire foreign workers they probably do
26:08
um okay i haven’t been really in touch with them so much now when you look at up north the oil
26:14
fields and the mining took a big hit right it did yeah with a drop in
26:20
commodities prices really dropped and i think people were laid off and
26:27
but it’s picking up again you know great so what why don’t we
26:32
sorry go ahead we’ve done remarkably well through this pandemic good really have things are happening
26:38
here oh that’s great great so why don’t we dig into two things then
26:44
uh i want to ask you a little bit more about students and a little bit more about
26:49
your business uh startup program so so with the students what advice do
26:57
you have for students or people that want to take the student path in
27:03
in getting their permanent residency in canada so to to enter the student path
27:08
and become canadian citizens eventually take your courses carefully get them in
27:14
line with what what you know what you’re passionate about find a course that’s
27:21
a good fit for you that will give you a post-graduate work permit
27:26
two things you know we might be able to help out and i’ll give a plug at students at riri
27:34
i have a director that will help out choosing a course and a path
27:40
we work with any school or institution in canada but primarily with the university of regina
27:46
and i find that works because i’m five minutes away i’ve worked there i’ve graduated from there i know it’s it’s a
27:53
great school um but as i said previously sas polytech is a
27:59
fantastic skills reach international will be implementing
28:06
a direct student to work to pr
28:12
program for select probably starting in agriculture maybe some health care and hospitality
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and that’ll be in 2022 and it’ll be a pilot project for us
28:24
where we will assist people who come into one of the industries if
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it’s hospitality tourism it would be because that fits with our other area
28:37
or ag something like that and they take their their course they get their
28:43
postgraduate work permit will give them some canadian experiences some saskatchewan experience that they can go
28:50
into sorry can you you got that the bell again can you repeat that yeah i don’t even know how to turn it off i’m sorry no worries
28:56
but uh like i’m saying let’s say we have someone going into hospitality and
29:02
tourism then we’ll get help them get into school get into the appropriate program
29:09
and when they’re done we’ll give them an internship or work experience program
29:15
for at least the six months that will qualify them for pr
29:20
great that’s that’s super yeah i’m finding you know i’m a parent and i see all these moms
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and dads sending their children to canada for a better life and
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they go into courses like when i went to school everybody got a bachelor of psychology
29:41
and did nothing with it and so i really want to help these people send their children here and say here
29:49
here’s a great path to go on and maybe they won’t stay on
29:54
that path but i’ll sure open their eyes and they’ll be exposed to different things they might be our next restaurant
30:00
owner you know or or entrepreneur or you know start farming or do something
30:08
i think it’s kind of my passion you know to help people out like that and that’s
30:13
wonderful i think having that that kind of insight and experience uh to learn from and and choose a path i think is
30:20
going to be really helpful for a lot of people it’s um it’s hard to have the kind of foresight
30:26
and stuff when you’re a young person you haven’t really connected all the dots yet right
30:31
yeah so that’s good so what kind of resources if somebody wants to do that take that path what kind of resources should they
30:38
have and what kind of steps should they take to get started i mean every every path starts with one step right right
30:45
right well first of all i mean again if they email us
30:50
we can help them do that and and just for we have different people in charge of different areas so
30:56
it’s students at riri.ca business at
31:02
riris.ca you know employers at riri.ca and it helps because we get so many
31:10
so many things um sure you can stream them to the right people right and you know if they forget that just go to our
31:16
website ri r-i-r-i-dot-c we have so much information but if someone wants to
31:22
you know go and help needs help on a direct path to pr um they can certainly email us and we’ll
31:30
see how they can fit into a school and get them into that so that they can go
31:36
on to what they need to do excellent uh you know if i can say
31:43
if you know if you are going through a consultant uh you
31:48
honestly you get what you deserve if you don’t go through somebody who’s licensed and i can’t stress that enough there’s
31:56
so many what we call ghost consultants out there who aren’t licensed and i for instance i’m licensed
32:03
in canada through iccrc they have everybody listed on their website you can check people out
32:09
yeah so so the takeaway there is if you’re if you’re uh dealing with somebody about immigrating to canada
32:16
and you want to check their credentials you can simply just go to the ircc iccrc
32:23
the ic crc website yeah and and put in their information and make sure they’re
32:28
a registered uh immigration consultant right but in saskatchewan you have to also be licensed there
32:35
so you may be on the iccrc site right and saying oh i can get you a job or
32:40
whatever in saskatchewan and if you’re not licensed here it’s still illegal and also in nova
32:47
scotia and how would you ver how would you verify lawyer credentials
32:53
for a foreign if you want to go through a lawyer i would imagine just the bar
33:00
so you’d check the the saskatchewan bar and then the bar over each different province to make sure they’re they’re uh
33:07
red they’re they actually have their bar and they’re registered um as lawyers in that province
33:13
yeah yeah don’t believe on their website just because it says on a website
33:18
doesn’t mean it’s true yeah and it’s heartbreaking how many people i get that have spent tens and thousands
33:26
of dollars really yeah well a lot so
33:32
on that note do you want to share roughly what you what somebody should expect to pay as a job seeker or as an
33:39
employer for either going through a process or to come into
33:44
canada or to um to recruit foreign job seekers what is
33:50
there a number you can share with us that would be like an industry standard or expectation industry standard okay
33:55
there isn’t there really isn’t um we’re all private practices
34:01
so it’s not you know it’s um i guess the key
34:06
takeaway from that is shop around but i may charge you 200 an hour
34:14
and you may charge 400 an hour but you might get it done in half an hour and i’ll take six hours yup okay so so i
34:21
think you have to weigh uh the knowledge of the person and um generally under our oath we don’t
34:28
take cases that we’re not confident in so if i’m not sure about something i will
34:35
go to a colleague and ask them to to do it with me
34:40
awesome you know i think the one thing about the rric is the regulated
34:47
immigration consultancies we we want the best for our clients and we we want success at the end
34:54
where you have somebody a ghost consultant
35:01
what are you going to do you have no record you have no recourse is that the idea yeah well they’re
35:06
usually outside canada i think um i looked up a number and there was only 13 registered in india but there must be
35:13
hundreds of offices hmm i see you know there’s two i think registered
35:19
in vietnam and there’s hundreds of offices so okay
35:25
so do your homework if you’re if you’re looking to come to canada you’re you’re a foreign job seeker or you want to come
35:30
in as a student do your homework do your research to make sure they’re legitimate and shop around talk to
35:37
three or ten or however many you feel you should and make sure you find somebody that’s comfortable with you
35:43
probably a bad sign is somebody who wants you to to not to talk to other people and just to uh just forge ahead
35:49
with them and and do your due diligence
35:54
exactly yeah everything is available on the cip website
36:00
people can do it on their own well that’s one thing for people to take away as well is that the canadian
36:05
government has tons of information there’s canada is very good at putting all kinds
36:11
of helpful information online uh including you know sites like jobsoncanada.com and
36:17
private sites like that as well as government sites and the provincial sites i think the provincial sites are
36:22
really key too because i think that’s probably overlooked by a lot of foreign job seekers is okay there’s a federal program for
36:28
coming into canada but what about the specific programs of coming into saskatchewan ontario manitoba nova
36:34
scotia right right and and our site at riri.ca we have so much information
36:43
on everything because i noticed that guy oh awesome that helps nothing to do
36:49
with me he’s behind this but um you know there’s a lot of information
36:55
but it does speak to it is a life-changing
37:01
decision that people are making it is a lot of money no matter which way you look at it
37:08
you know selling your assets in your house and everything another country moving over
37:13
so it’s your comfort level do you want a professional taking care of you you know and and we take them right from
37:21
the beginning whether it’s a student a worker a business person right through to settlement services
37:27
helping people find the right place to live schools and all that kind of stuff
37:32
right or so having having a guide to take you through so you’re not in the dark trying to figure out where
37:38
the nooks and crannies and turns and and uh pathways are well i swear that things
37:44
can change on the fly here i sometimes wonder if they wake up and say
37:49
i you know i need to print something new today well and i think now there’s a lot
37:54
there’s going to be a lot of changes because the whole world is changing yeah yeah
38:00
yeah that’s so great daria thanks so much for joining us welcome thank you coach i
38:05
really appreciate it take care ciao bye and that concludes this bernie chats for
38:11
jobs in canada.com thank you so much for listening please feel free to subscribe
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